Delta Light confirms international ambitions with opening of new wing at headquarters



On October 22, we have festively inaugurated the new wing of our headquarters – which features an impressive, 26 metres high architectural lightbox - by presenting unique pop-up light artworks by four internationally renowned artists. The expansion is a symbol of our international ambitions for growth. “We have an unshakeable faith in our future in Belgium and thanks to this major expansion, we intend to double our turnover yet again in the decade to come”, announced Managing Director Operations Peter Ameloot.

With the brand-new, 26 metres high, monumental lightbox structure that has a total of 307 m2 surface area in glass, the Delta Light headquarters have become a real architectural eye-catcher. Designed by the Bruges-based architects Govaert & Vanhoutte, the building reflects the company's lighting philosophy: functional but with that little extra touch of design and high-tech simplicity. The new wing took 15 months to build and will provide an additional 5,500 m², bringing the total area of the complex to 37,500 m².

According to founder Paul Ameloot, the main reasons for investing in this project were the non-stop expansion of R&D, international growth, future ambitions and the extra logistical challenges posed by the increasing complexity of the sector. “Since it was founded, Delta Light has focused on in-house design, product development and production. This creative process requires constant alertness and the use of new technologies. If we are to realise the company's ambitions in terms of innovation and R&D, we are going to need a lot of extra space.”

Internationally renowned artists celebrate the milestone year 2015

As a year full of ambition, expansion and new potential, 2015 represents a major milestone for Delta Light. To mark the occasion, internationally known Belgian and British artists were invited to create pop-up art installations, each of which expresses one of the core values or differentiating factors of Delta Light.

Fred Eerdekens – Shine 
In his sculptures, Fred Eerdekens (°1951, lives and works in Hasselt) explores light and shadow, thus raising questions about our perception. At first sight, his works often appear to be an incomprehensible tangle of shapes. But adding the element of light brings out a different dimension, and through the play of shadows, they come into focus. For Delta Light, Eerdekens created the 7 metres long work ‘Shine’, a reference to the brilliant success story of Delta Light and the warmth of the family business. “The sculpture itself does not shine. On the contrary, it is a matte object that absorbs all light. Only its shadow is legible. This contradiction is an ongoing theme in my work. You can also associate ‘shine’ with the Dutch word schijnen, 'to appear'. Something that is not what it appears. There again you have that constant uncertainty, and the duality between light and shadow. What's more, as an artist, I always stay in the background and let the work speak for itself. I see a certain parallel there with Delta Light: their lighting allows buildings, interiors and objects to tell their own stories.”
www.fred-eerdekens.be

Them Sculptures - Digital Jungle
Tom Dekyvere (°1985, lives and works in Gent) is a young artist with roots – like Delta Light - in West Flanders. He has built an international reputation for his dramatic geometric cord sculptures. His work for Delta Light incorporates 2 km of fluorescent cord, onto which light is projected. In this way he visually expresses not only Delta Light's worldwide network, but also the contrast between the natural and the artificial, technological world. "In the production at Delta Light as well, analogue and digital, humans and robots, go hand in hand. The connection with the new building is also important, because the projecting glass volume in which the work is installed suggests a sort of museum/greenhouse, created to 'cultivate' the work."
www.themsculptures.com

Ian Wright – Paper In Progress
As an illustrator, Ian Wright (°1953, lives and works in London) has gained renown for pieces created for the likes of Tony Bennett and Givenchy. He often incorporates everyday and recycled materials into his work, such as buttons and paper. For Delta Light, he took the famous Lighting Bible as a starting point, in order to emphasise the company's unique craftsmanship. “It's the first time that I've used a catalogue as raw material. So for me, the commission was a challenge to develop new methods of working. The paper has a specific character and there's a tremendous variation in colour tones. The inspiration photos could be understood as light in a kind of static, printed form. Just like a painter, I worked layer by layer to create a playful, larger than life – 90 cm wide and 120 cm tall – portrait of founder Paul Ameloot.”
www.mrianwright.co.uk

Bompas & Parr – Chromaphagia
In their work, the British ‘culinary wonderboys’ Bompas & Parr (based in London) explore the science behind taste, and how it can be influenced by an environment. For Delta Light, the design duo created the installation ‘Chromaphagia’. “This installation is an expression of our philosophy that space changes our experience of taste. We invite visitors to eat the same food in three different atmospheres, so as to experience the way the flavour is affected by light, colour and sound. Since light is a crucial element in creating atmosphere, it is the primary ingredient. What's more, by controlling the light, we can not only create an experience, but we can also control how the visitors feel about it. Light is therefore essential to our experience. After all, according to the science of synaesthesia, our senses mutually interact,” explains Harry Parr. In their installation, Bompas & Parr show how light also often indirectly plays a key role in our experience, in a nod to the 'Pure Lighting Pleasure' credo of Delta Light.
www.bompasandparr.com

View the Official Aftermovie of the Grand Opening here!

Back to top